Transitioning | Lampoon Magazine | Rahim Fortune | Rachael Wang | Dé Randle

Throughout the history of the United States, once predominantly Black communities – Shinnecock Bay and Sag Harbor in New York, Rosewood in Florida, among others – have been displaced through Jim Crow laws, urban redevelopment and gentrification. On his car ride from New York City to Sag Harbor, he twisted through small hamlets, arriving in Southampton, a bucolic panoply of ostentatiousness – a stark change from the straightaway avenues of Texas. Through this series, the idea of the waterfront community is re-envisioned. «I wanted to show images of Black people in front of water enjoying themselves, maybe a family celebration or a Sunday celebration, without overly bearing historical or political overtones. Black people and Indigenous people have been in waterfront communities for so long and have deep connections to these places. Cherishing our connection with Earth hasn’t always been historically granted.

Ange Noir (2016)

A film project that explores the emotional balance between the photographer and the subject, this work debuted alongside a series of portraits at the Henao Contemporary Center in Orlando, FL.

Ange Noir started out as an exercise to challenge the camera related fear I was facing at the time, I was very new to photography and this was a big step out of my comfort zone. I asked each subject to step in front of the camera and deliver how they were currently feeling, more often than not I was terrified, anxious and uncomfortable in many of these situations. My emotional state was reflected and translated back in each portrait.

original soundtrack by Oichentka Temple

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